News and Features

The Big Deal: Dallas Summer Musicals Presents Dinosaur Train: Live! Buddy’s Big Adventure

BD dino train post

All aboard for this week’s special Art&Seek Jr. Big Deal – from Dallas Summer Musicals. Enter to win a family 4-pack of tickets to see Jim Henson’s Dinosaur Train: Live! Buddy’s Big Adventure. Take your family to see Buddy and his family come to life in this live interactive production. Through interactivity, music and laughter your teeny tots will not only enjoy this musical journey with their favorite characters from the popular PBS series, but they will also learn a thing or two about their Dinosaur pals. The Dinosaur Train pulls up to Music Hall at Fair Park on Jan. 17.

Now that you got the little ones taken care of, do something for the grownups in  your family. Check out our other Big Deal this week, tickets to see TITAS Presents Ronald K. Brown/Evidence, A Dance Company at AT&T Performing Arts Center.

PLEASE NOTE: Only Art&Seek e-newsletter subscribers can win the Big Deal.  If you are not a subscriber then take care of that first, then sign up below for a chance to sing and dance with Buddy and his friends in Dinosaur Train: Live! Buddy’s Big Adventure.

UPDATE:  We have our winner. Thanks for playing.

Leave a comment

The Big Deal: TITAS Presents Ronald K. Brown/Evidence At The AT&T Performing Arts Center

Photo: AT&T Performing Arts Center

Photo: AT&T Performing Arts Center

Ronald K. Brown/Evidence, A Dance Company takes the stage at the Winspear Opera House. The Brooklyn BRIC House dancers perform works choreographed by Brown and accompanied by the soulful songs of the legendary Stevie Wonder.  Sign up to win a night of great dance and music with this TITAS presentation on Jan. 17 at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in Dallas.

Now is also the perfect time to do something for the little ones in your life. Check out our other Big Deal this week – family tickets to see Jim Henson’s Dinosaur Train: Live! Buddy’s Big Adventure presented by Dallas Summer Musicals at Music Hall at Fair Park.

PLEASE NOTE: Only Art&Seek e-newsletter subscribers can win the Big Deal.  If you are not a subscriber then take care of that first, then sign up below for a chance to see Ronald K. Brown/Evidence perform.

UPDATE:  We have our winner. Thanks for playing.

Leave a comment

Art&Seek Jr: Celebrate The Imagination In 2015

Art&Seek Jr. is one mom‘s quest to find activities to end the seemingly endless chorus of the “I’m Bored Blues” while having fun herself.  Impossible you say? Check back on Tuesdays for kid-friendly events that are fun for adults, too.

I witnessed something pretty comical yesterday that got me thinking about how kids play and reminded me to never, never, never buy a toy that advertises “hours of fun.”

Picture this: It’s 11 days post Christmas and our house is bursting at the seams with Monster High dolls, Beanie Boos, puzzles, games, LEGOs and various other loot that my child acquired during the joyous holiday season. The packaging alone for all this….stuff has filled three trash cans. I’m in the middle of trying to figure out where we’re going to stash the latest army of zombie dolls when I look outside and see Rose and three of her friends playing with a broken hand cart. And when I say playing, I mean full-on frolicking accompanied by open-mouth laughing and little girl squealing. They were having a great time, and it went on for quite a while despite the cool temperatures outdoors. As I watched them play I was instantly reminded of the old box cliche. You know the one–it’s when the kids overlook the fantastic, fancy toys and play with the box or bubble wrap instead. Of course these kids took it a step farther. Not only did they ignore the toys, but they passed up three trash cans full of bubble wrap and boxes and opted for a broken hand cart with a wobbly wheel instead.

Next year I’m doing my shopping at the dump.

Here’s are some picks to help you get those imaginations pumping–no batteries required.

Read More »

Leave a comment

Flickr Photo Of The Week

No Comments
Categorized Under: Visual Arts

1

Congratulations to Jörg Marx of Sandsbach, Lower Bavaria, Germany, the winner of the Flickr Photo of the Week contest. This Jörg’s first win for our contest. He follows last week’s winner Michael Tooke of Coppell .

If you would like to participate in the Flickr Photo of the Week contest, all you need to do is upload your photo to our our Flickr group page. It’s fine to submit a photo you took earlier than the current week, but we are hoping that the contest will inspire you to go out and shoot something fantastic this week to share with Art&Seek users. If the picture you take involves a facet of the arts, even better. The contest week will run from Tuesday to Monday, and the Art&Seek staff will pick a winner on Friday afternoon. We’ll notify the winner through FlickrMail (so be sure to check those inboxes) and ask you to fill out a short survey to tell us a little more about yourself and the photo you took. We’ll post the winners’ photo on Tuesday.

Now here’s more from Jörg.

Title of photo: Untitled from the series “Dogscapes”

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D with Canon EF 200 mm

Tell us more about your photo: “Dogscapes” is a personal project that I’ve been pursuing for several years. I try to catch the interaction between natural landscape and my dog. Website: http://joerg-marx.de/

Leave a comment

Clements Hospital Art : A Prescription for Precision

Mascarenhas, Winston - Pas de Deux

“Pas de Deux” by Winston Mascarenhas.

Guest Blogger Gail Sachson, MFA owns ASK ME ABOUT ART,offering lectures, tours and program planning.

When choosing a physician, we search for assuredness and technical proficiency. We look for an expert with a plan to help us get well. I suggest that the curatorial team at the new William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital at UT Southwestern seems to have employed the same criteria when choosing art for the innovative hospital, which replaced St. Paul and opened its doors on December 5th, 2014. Works from talented locally based artists, as well as national and international artists, are represented. The selections applaud our home grown talent in art, as well as in medicine.

The art works  which embellish the glass walled public waiting areas and walkways are tied together by attention getting bright colors and geometric shapes. Circles and squares dominate. Although several works are majestic in their whiteness, the mostly  brightly colored works wake up the walls and emit a vitality to the vast spaces. A hospital admission officer confirmed that patients “stare at the geometric designs”. She  is convinced that “the organization and colors take the patients’ stress away.”

clemmens hospital

Clements Hospital.

For the most part, the collection at Clements seems to be a prescription  to promote a sense of order, stillness and security. There are a few glass works, ceramics, computerized pieces, a 114″ long whimsical sculpture by Brooklyn artist Nathan Carter and several light box pieces. One or two of the selections were commissioned, such as a collage work by Lance Letscher, who shows locally at Conduit Gallery. Most  art works were selected from visits to galleries and studios by savvy scouts . with keen eyes and guidance by Jeffrey Grove, former curator of contemporary art at the Dallas Museum of Art and a member of the hospital’s Art Advisory Committee.   UT Southwestern friends and supporters Margaret Anne Cullum, Roger Horchow, Barbara Lemmon, Bonnie Pitman, Deedie Rose, Nancy Seay, Gay Solomon and Jeremy Strick were also on the advisory committee.

The focus on precision as a prescription for calmness in the chaotic world of hospitals and illness is evident in most of the chosen works. The sense of organization is evident in the perfect placement as well. It is difficult to discern which came first- the building design, the furniture arrangement or the niches  and nooks for the art. UT Southwestern Art Curator, Courtney Crothers, who oversees all the art in all the buildings on campus, somewhat agrees when I stress the geometry evident in many of the works. I point out the linear designs, the straight edges, the absence of accidents or abstract expressionistic experiments. She says,” Many of the artists take a scientific approach to making art. They seem to have a system.”

A system, the joy of process and the delight in deliberation is evident is Dallas artist Winston Lee Mascarenhas’ encaustic work, “Pas de Deux”.  Mascarenhas, a retired anesthesiologist, winner of the 2014 Hunting Prize, shows with the Craighead-Green Gallery. He and John Pomara, whose oil on aluminum panels, ” Off Key”, are installed on the second floor of the three story atrium, are both artists who exhibit controlled exuberance within grids, linear designs and a musical influence, as evidenced by unevenly distributed deep groves and erratically broken lines, similar to musical orchestration or perhaps the visual evidence of  sound and cardiac electrical activity. Pomara’s art is in the DMA collection, and he shows with the Barry Whistler Gallery.

For now, visitors can conjure up their own titles. Soon labels will provide titles, artist information and didactic text. Crothers spoke of a possible app for those who would like to learn more. Indeed, she has grand ideas of programs and partnerships promoting wellness along with art. I feel better already.

 

 

Leave a comment

Saturday Spotlight – Dance! Dance! Dance!

No Comments
Categorized Under: Uncategorized

images

For this week’s Art & Seek Spotlight, we’re off to “Dance! Dance! Dance!” at the South Dallas Cultural Center to kick off the new dance education initiative, Dances of the African Diaspora. Michelle Gibson kicks things off with her Samba Workshop where you’ll learn all about the Brazilian dance and its African roots. Look for upcoming workshops including Afro-Funk and New Orleans Second Line.

 

MichelleTeaching

getimage

Leave a comment

Good For Your Ears: KXT’s Top Albums Of 2014

No Comments
Categorized Under: KXT, Music

mixtape2

 

The KXT team has chosen their favorite albums of 2014. See which artists kept Mark Abuzzahab, Gini Mascorro and Amy Miller tapping their toes last year. Check out KXT Mixtape 2014.

Leave a comment

Flickr Photo Of The Week

No Comments
Categorized Under: Visual Arts

flicker post

Congratulations to Michael Tooke of Coppell, the winner of the Flickr Photo of the Week contest. This is the second time Michael has won our little contest. He follows last win came in April. He follows last week’s winner Michael Rumsey of Richardson.

If you would like to participate in the Flickr Photo of the Week contest, all you need to do is upload your photo to our Flickr group page. It’s fine to submit a photo you took earlier than the current week, but we are hoping that the contest will inspire you to go out and shoot something fantastic this week to share with Art&Seek users. If the picture you take involves a facet of the arts, even better. The contest week will run from Tuesday to Monday, and the Art&Seek staff will pick a winner on Friday afternoon. We’ll notify the winner through FlickrMail (so be sure to check those inboxes) and ask you to fill out a short survey to tell us a little more about yourself and the photo you took. We’ll post the winners’ photo on Tuesday.

Now here’s more from Michael.

Title of photo: Stainless Reflection

Equipment: Nikon D7000 with Nikkor 105mm Lens

Tell us more about your photo: I was inspired to take this photo on a late evening walking to the refrigerator when nothing but the Christmas tree lights were on. The result is what you see in the photo, colorful tree lights reflected on the stainless steel doors.

Leave a comment

The Top 10 Films Of 2014

No Comments
Categorized Under: Film and Television
IFC

IFC

1. Boyhood – Richard Linklater’s meditation on the passing of time is not only the best film of 2014, it’s also the most ambitious. What sounded like a gimmick – filming for three weeks every fall for a dozen years – becomes a brilliant tool for deep connection between viewer and character. Turns out when you watch a kid morph from a tyke to a teen, you get attached.

2. Birdman – Alejandro González Iñárritu keeps his cameras in constant motion in this kinetically energetic look at life in a theater. It’s a movie with a lot on its mind, but it’s sharpest when exploring the relative merits of live performance vs. film.

3. Whiplash – Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons go toe-to-toe as a student drummer and impossible-to-please band director. Think Training Day set in a conservatory. The wordless, on-stage showdown between the two is the most rewarding ending to a movie this year. And between its score and the similarly swinging music in Birdman, jazz is definitely back on the big screen.

4. Fury – World War II is all but wrapped up, and yet the members of a battle-hardened tank unit are sent out again and again to look death in the eye. It’s a gritty exploration of the unyielding connection among brothers-in-arms.

5. The Lego Movie – This is what it feels like to smile for 100 straight minutes. Chris Pratt transfers his Everyman persona to the animated world as an anonymous Lego construction worker charged with saving the day. But Will Arnett’s Batman and Will Ferrell’s Lord Business steal the show.

6. American Sniper – Bradley Cooper is nearing Sean Penn-level range as he follows his portrayals of a mental patient (Silver Linings Playbook) and a wild-eyed FBI agent (American Hustle) with a quietly internal reading of Texan Chris Kyle. Director Clint Eastwood uses abrupt cuts to transition from the chaos of battle to the unnerving calm of the home front. In the process, we understand why Kyle can’t ever get his mind and body in the same place.

7. Calvary – Brendan Gleeson gives a master class in wordless communication as a priest bracing for his own murder. As the lone shining light in a world of darkness, it’s a moving display of bravery and stoicism.

8. A Most Wanted Man – Director Anton Corbijn adapts John le Carré’s story of the messy business of the war on terror. And in doing so, he pulls off the rare trick of telling the story more clearly and concisely than the source material. Sadly, Philip Seymour Hoffman’s last standout performance.

9. The Grand Budapest Hotel – Easily the prettiest movie of the year – if you’re looking for something to play in the background of a party, this is the one. But it’s plenty good with the volume up, too. Ralph Fiennes is a bundle of nervous energy as the concierge of a legendary European hotel.

10. What If – Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan trade rapid-fire bon mots as best friends who might be more if not for her boyfriend. Billy Wilder would be proud.

Honorable mentions: The Theory of Everything, Into the Woods, Chef, The Imitation Game, Big Hero 6, Wild, Gone Girl

Caveat: Try as I might, I’ve been unable to catch Selma, Love Is Strange and a few others that I have every expectation of being top-notch. If only there were more hours in the day.

Leave a comment

Critic’s Choice: The Year in Texas Music

Miranda-Lambert

Miranda Lambert rises to the top.

We close out our Critic’s Choice series with David Okamoto’s Top 10 in Texas Music. Okamoto, a regular KERA commentator, works as a content production manager at Yahoo! in Dallas. His music reviews have previously appeared in such publications as Rolling Stone, ICE magazine and the Dallas Morning News.

2014 Critic’s Choice Series:

Listen to David Okamoto’s Top 10, which aired on KERA FM:

2014 turned out to be a bittersweet year in Texas music, as the last five months were clouded by the deaths of Houston jazz pianist Joe Sample, Beaumont blues legend Johnny Winter, Slaton-reared Rolling Stones sideman Bobby Keys, and Austin-based Ian McLagan of British band The Faces. But David Okamoto found solace in these 10 albums by Lone Star artists who embrace the legacy that those departed musicians made even richer.

 

 

Read More »

Leave a comment
Page 40 of 1,000« First...102030...3839404142...506070...Last »