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Art&Seek Jr: 6 Egg-cellent Adventures For Your Little Bunny

Art&Seek Jr. is one mom‘s quest to find activities to end the seemingly endless chorus of the “I’m Bored Blues” while having fun herself.  Impossible you say? Check back on Tuesdays for kid-friendly events that are fun for adults, too.

This Easter is a little bittersweet for me. At almost 9, Rose isn’t exactly letting on that there’s no magical rabbit that delivers chocolate–ever the practical girl, she doesn’t want to miss out on the free candy in case she’s wrong. But you can see the look of doubt in her eyes whenever E. Bunny’s name comes up.  I’d love to keep up the charade until she’s 30, but I’m thinking this will probably be the Easter Bunny’s last trip to our house.

Mr. Bunny wasn’t always welcome in our house. When Rose was about 3, she wasn’t exactly on board with him. She’d seen a giant bunny “with big scary eyes” roving about at the mall and she just didn’t like the idea of this strange bunny/man letting himself into our house when everyone was asleep–chocolate or not. A stuffed rabbit named Stella and a bumper crop of peeps finally brought her around.

This is how it went down:

Here are some Easter picks to enjoy with your little bunnies.

One of the best things about Easter in Texas are Cascarones. In case you’re new to the area or just unfamiliar with this fun tradition, let me explain: cascarones are colorful, hollowed out, confetti-filled eggs that are crushed over the head of unsuspecting friend. Having a cascarón broken over one’s head is said to bring good luck, but the recipient usually doesn’t feel that way and an all out cascarones war breaks out, but they are still great fun. Our pals over at Oil and Cotton can show you how to how to make the perfect cascarones at their Cascarones Easter Camp this Friday from 9 to noon. The camp is for ages 4 to 12, but teens and adults are welcome too.

Speaking of teens, Denia Recreation Center in Denton is hosting a Teen Twilight Egg Hunt Wednesday night at 8 p.m. Teens can grab their flashlights and hunt for eggs are filled with cash, coupons, and gift cards to local businesses. The fun continues on Saturday morning at the super-duper Easter Eggstravaganza and Annual City Egg Hunt. The fun starts at the Denton Civic Center at 9:30 a.m. with a bounce house, tons of arts and crafts, and a fun magic show. Then at 11:30 a.m. the Easter Egg Hunt begins at Quakertown Park where kiddos can hunt for over 21,000 filled eggs. Kids are divided into groups based on age and grades, so be sure to  arrive early to find your designated group in the park.

Ready! Set! Hunt! (photo: Fort Worth Stockyards Station)

Ready! Set! Hunt! (photo: Fort Worth Stockyards Station)

Special needs children can take part in an egg hunt designed especially for them at the 4th Annual Especially Needed Eggstravaganza.  This free event is for families with special-needs children and their siblings and will include an Easter egg hunt, inflatables, games, pictures with the Easter Bunny and more. Everyone will have an opportunity to hunt eggs at their own pace and there will also be special hunts for adults and individuals that require wheelchair assistance.

Everybody say Yippee Ki Yay! the Texas sized Easter Egg Celebration at Fort Worth Stockyards Station happens this Saturday. There will be an ginormous egg hunt for all ages that begins at noon, and afterwards there will be photos with the Easter Bunny, face painting, a balloon-animal maker and more. For even more fun, be sure to take the kids to the Stockyard Stables to hunt for the Golden Horseshoe.

If you haven’t any plans for Sunday, then a ride aboard the Easter Bunny Train on the Grapevine Vintage Railroad might be just the ticket. Besides a super-fun train ride, the little kiddles can expect an appearance by the rabbit de jour, and afterwards there will be an egg hunt with eggs filled with prizes.

Therese Powell is an Art&Seek calendar coordinator and KERA-TV producer. She spends most of her free time seeking out adventures for her 8-year-old daughter, Rose. Tell us about your quirky kid adventures by leaving a comment. Or e-mail Therese at tpowell@kera.org