News and Features

Thursday Morning Roundup

AT THE OPERA: Last week, those of us in the media received a heads up from the Dallas Opera that a major announcement was coming on Tuesday. But that was all the details we received. (Suspense!) Now we know at least what we’ll be finding out: the DO will announce a new music director – only the third person ever appointed to the position. A news release sent out yesterday says the person is “a respected and internationally acclaimed conductor.” We’ll let you know who it is next week.

DMA AWARDS: The Dallas Museum of Art has announced the recipients of the 2013 Awards to Artists. The Clare Hart DeGolyer Memorial Fund is awarded to artists 15-25 who live in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona or Colorado. Lauren Christlieb, Nathan Evans, Miguel Martinez, Benjamin Terry and Ana Villagomez earned that one. The Arch and Anne Giles Kimbrough Fund is awarded to residents of Texas under the age of 30. It goes to Morehshin Allahyari, Jordan Glazer, Nicolas G. Miller and Jonathan A. Molina Garcia. And the Otis and Velma Davis Dozier Travel Grant goes to Matthew Bourbon and Jeff F. Wheeler. More details are on the museum’s website.

A BITE OUT OF APPLE: Tonight is opening night for Amphibian Stage Productions’ The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs. It’s essentially a monologue by Mike Daisey about his investigation into Apple’s dealings in China. If that name sounds familiar, then you probably heard the performance on This American Life. And if you heard that, then you definitely remember the follow-up, when the show devoted a whole episode to retracting the story. Amphibian has brought Jaime Castañeda in to direct. And he tells dfw.com that the ideas put forth in the show are still valid – even if Daisey’s details were fabricated. “My sense is that Mike Daisey was trying to convince [Apple] to change the way they work with Foxconn and the conditions in China,” Castañeda says. “But it’s wider than that. This is an issue that happens in countries all over the world. We see it happening south of the border here in Texas. That has been happening for decades.”